Weekly News

Stunning Modern Palaces for an Ancient Sport

May 18,2017 16:21

The bowling alley, then, is a modern phenomenon. Robert Goetzfried, a German photographer interested in patterns and architecture, set out to document the palaces for sport—from a single alley under an Italian restaurant to Europe's largest bowling ...



While bowling gains new fans in hipster enclaves of New York and London, a German photographer is documenting a cradle of the sport.
by

May 18, 2017, 12:01 AM EDT

Bowling is thousands of years old: Scientists have uncovered similar games during times of Egyptian pharaohs and Germanic tribesman, who spent idle time between wars by throwing stones at bones. The bowling alley, then, is a modern phenomenon. Robert Goetzfried, a German photographer interested in patterns and architecture, set out to document the palaces for sport—from a single alley under an Italian restaurant to Europe's largest bowling center. Today, Germans remain among the most enthusiastic bowlers in Europe. Some 100,000 people organized in 5,000 clubs either pursue the American 10-pin bowling or its European predecessor, a sport called Kegeln. Kegeln is similar to bowling, but it uses just nine pins and smaller balls. While bowling has become increasingly popular in recent years in Germany, Kegeln is still played religiously in the country's rural regions, including in Bavaria. Photographs by Robert Goetzfried

Schnitzel and Beer at Wirtshaus Muenchner Tram

This wood-paneled Kegel alley could be anywhere in Germany because it's so typical—located inside a traditional Bavarian beer tavern in southeastern Munich, where you can bowl and have a Schnitzel with wheat beer.

Pasta at the Curva Est

This two-lane alley is located below an Italian restaurant and is the bowling alley for local sports club TSV Munchen Ost.

Good Enough for the Pros at Hasenheide

The Hasenheide Hotel in Fuerstenfeldbruck near Munich has a total of 8 Kegel alleys, including 4 so-called Bundeskegelbahnen, professional alleys designed for tournament and league play. Prices start at €9 ($10) an hour.

Dream Bowl, the King of Europe

With 52 alleys, Dream Bowl is the largest bowling center in Europe.

American Style at Isar Bowling

Isar Bowling is a classic American style bowling alley.

The Sports Club at SV Muenchen von 1880 e.V.

This Munich-based sports club has several Kegel teams that play on six fully automatic alleys.

Traditional Kegel at La Migliore

In Munich, lots of restaurants have a Kegel alley to lure customers—including this Italian one called La Migliore. Made entirely out of wood, it accommodates up to 30 people and prices start at €10 an hour.

AMF Alleys at Max Bowling

Thanks to the rising popularity of U.S.-style bowling, places like Max Munich Bowling now also exist in the Bavarian capital. Opened in 2010, the 3,000 square meter place offers 30 Quibica AMF bowling alleys, a Mexican restaurant, free Wi-fi and 250 parking spaces outside.

Pizza e Pasta

Another Italian restaurant, two more Kegel alleys. This time at Pizze e Pasta in Munich.

The Tavern and Kegel at Rondell

This tavern in Garching near Munich has 4 Kegel alleys for up to 40 players.

Zunfthaus and the Inn

This alley is housed at the Zunfthaus Austrian-Bavarian inn, in central Munich.

pursuits,world

Share this article

Related videos

Dubai : 10 Must Visit Places
Dubai : 10 Must Visit Places
[OFFICIAL VIDEO] Hallelujah - Pentatonix
[OFFICIAL VIDEO] Hallelujah - Pentatonix

DON'T MISS THIS STORIES