Weekly News

Got beef with a business? This app handles the dirty work for you

July 19,2016 17:13

On Tuesday, Service rolled out a feature called Protect that aims to make it even easier for customers to take advantage of its business proposition. Protect adds a couple of new elements to the app, such as synching with email accounts so it can ...and more »



NEW YORK (CNNMoney) - Service is fighting a very good fight. It wants to handle all your customer service woes.The startup, which launched its free app in December, uses a mix of technology and humans to get customers money back for service issues. Or, at the very least, it aims to save you a lot of time emailing and talking to customer service reps.On Tuesday, Service rolled out a feature called Protect that aims to make it even easier for customers to take advantage of its business proposition. Protect adds a couple of new elements to the app, such as synching with email accounts so it can automatically detect receipts and itineraries. If you've had an issue with a receipt or service, one tap can alert Service to look into it.It'll also monitor travel and flight itinerary and send a notification if you might be able to get compensated for delays or cancellations. Service is playing in a crowded, albeit noble, space. Startups like Trim and TrueBill help unearth subscriptions tied to your bank account or credit card to cancel unwanted ones. Pypestream launched a modern-day call center for customers to text with select businesses directly. And, Facebook announced Bots for Messenger in April.Meanwhile, AirHelp tackles flight compensation directly, but it hinges on a European law that requires passengers to be compensated financially for canceled or overbooked flights (unless there's an extraordinary circumstance -- like weather -- involved). Service, however, wants to step in to help people with domestic flights, not just for flights that originate or arrive in an EU airport."While European carriers legally must compensate delayed passengers, U.S.-based carriers aren't required to but often do so as a gesture of good will," said Service CEO Michael Schneider.Service has saved or recovered close to $1 million for its users to date, said Schneider. Depending on the request, fulfilling it could take anywhere from days (Uber, Amazon) to months (airlines).Recent fulfilled requests include getting one woman a $25 Amtrak voucher as an apology for buying a $8 salad on the train that was frozen solid at the bottom. The train attendant originally said she couldn't be refunded because it was partially eaten. Another request example: A couple sought a full refund of $2,200 for their babymoon getaway after finding out it was a destination impacted by the Zika virus.Service, which has raised $3.6 million in funding, said it turns down 25% of requests -- those it doesn't think are fair or reasonable complaints.

Business

Share this article

Related videos

Kevin Gates - Hard For (Official Audio)
Kevin Gates - Hard For (Official Audio)
How to BULK UP Fast!  (TRUTH about
How to BULK UP Fast! (TRUTH about "Bulking and...

DON'T MISS THIS STORIES