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Golf world mourns Lyle, sends prayers to family

August 09,2018 03:21

Revelation 21:4. He'll will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore for the former things have passed away#jarrodlyle pic.twitter.com/c3TSzMqtkD. — Steve Elkington ...

Golf world mourns Jarrod Lyle, sends prayers to family | Golf Channel

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Jarrod Lyle died on Wednesday after multiple battles with cancer. His peers reacted on social media with grief, and also support for Lyle's family.

A GoFundMe page to help support Lyle's family has been set up by Lyle's good friend Tripp Isenhour.

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In November 2013, GolfChannel.com senior writer Rex Hoggard traveled to Australia to document a remarkable story about a remarkable man - Jarrod Lyle. Lyle, then 32, was attempting a comeback in professional golf after having beaten cancer not just once, but twice. Lyle allowed Hoggard total access as he prepared to make his emotional return to the game at the Australian Masters. To view each part of Hoggard's award-winning series, click on the links below.
Jarrod Lyle: The Fighter Introduction | Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6

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1981 - Born on Aug. 21 in Shepparton, Victoria, Australia.
1987 - Introduced to golf at age 6 when he caddied for his father.
1998 - At age 17 is diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. Is confined to his bed for nine months while undergoing chemotherapy treatments.
2004 - Turns professional.
2006 - Finishes 18th on the Nationwide Tour money list and earns his PGA Tour card for 2007.
2007 - Finishes 164th on the money list and loses his card.
2008 - Back on the Nationwide Tour, wins twice (Mexican Open and Knoxville Open) and finished fourth on money list. Gets his PGA Tour card back.
2010 - Finishes fith in Q-School to earn his PGA Tour card for 2011.
2011 - Makes a hole-in-one at the Waste Management Phoenix Open on the par-3 16th 'Stadium Hole' winning $25,000 for a charity of his choice.
2011 - Marries his longtime partner, Briony Harper, in December. They have two daughters.
2011 - Has to return to Q-School, but again wins back his PGA Tour card.
2012 - Has his best finish in a PGA Tour event in February, tying for fourth place in the Northern Trust Open.
2012 - The next week, in Mayakoba Golf Classic, is bitten by an insect. Tests result in a diagnosis of recurrence of leukemia.
2013 - Makes his comeback in Taliker Masters.
2014 - Plays his first PGA Tour-sanctioned round in 29 months at Web.com Tour's Midwest Classic. Finishes T-11.
2014 - Makes his first PGA Tour start since 2012 after Monday qualifying for Frys.com Open in October. Makes cut and finishes T-31.
2017 - Leukemia returns in July.
2018 - His body no longer able to fight the cancer, opts for palliative care.
Aug. 8, 2018 - Passes away at age 36.

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Jarrod Lyle died on Wednesday night at home in Torquay, Australia, following his third bout with acute myeloid leukemia. He was 36.
Lyle, who played three full seasons on the PGA Tour, was placed in “palliative care” last week because “his body is no longer able to fight [leukemia],” and his wife, Briony, released a statement that said Lyle was with his family and friends when he passed away.
“Lusi, Jemma and I are filled with grief and now must confront our lives without the greatest husband and father we could ever have wished for,” Briony Lyle said in a statement. “At the same time, we have been blessed and overwhelmed with the messages and actions of support from around the world and feel comforted that Jarrod was able to happily impact so many people throughout his life.”
Jarrod Lyle: The Fighter Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6
Lyle was diagnosed with leukemia for the third time last year and in December underwent a haploidentical transplant and stem cell therapy in Australia, but his recovery was slowed by a mystery illness that resulted in a loss of vision.
Lyle was first diagnosed with leukemia as a teen-ager, but he earned his Tour card in 2007. In 2012, Lyle’s cancer returned, but he was declared cancer free the next year and returned to the Tour.
Although Lyle failed to retain his Tour membership in the United States, he returned to Australia to continue competing and started working as a television analyst.
Players at last week’s WGC-Bridgestone Invitational wore yellow ribbons to show their support for Lyle and a GoFundMe page was created to assist his family. Although his time on Tour was brief, reaction to Wednesday’s news was immediate.
“It is through a river of tears I say goodbye to my friend Jarrod Lyle,” Greg Chalmers tweeted. “A wonderful father, friend and golfer. Quick with a joke, didn’t mind a beer, and just a pure joy to be around every day. Miss you mate. RIP"
Trevor Immelman also tweeted, “Your strength, perseverance and courage was a example for all.” Lyle is survived by his wife, Briony, and daughters Lusi, 6 and Jemma, 2.
A GoFundMe page to help support Lyle's family has been set up by Lyle's good friend Tripp Isenhour.

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On this heartbreaking night when we lost Jarrod Lyle, I can’t help but think of when I first met him.
It was June 2011, and I’d flown to Memphis, Tenn., to write a magazine cover story on him. He was 29 at the time, cancer-free, and he’d agreed to visit the world-renowned St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital for the first time.
It scared the hell out of him.
When Jarrod was 17, he underwent treatment for acute myeloid leukemia. For nine months he was confined to a hospital bed in Melbourne, just like the ones they had at St. Jude. It very well could have been his final resting place; his doctors gave him only a 20-percent chance of surviving.
The days largely blurred together, but he vividly recalled talking at night with some of the new friends he’d made in his wing. Then he’d wake up the next morning and some of them would be gone, with no warning, the horrible disease claiming more victims far too young.
The memories haunted him, as he wondered why he was spared and some of his mates were not.
“It’s left a black hole in me,” he said then.
His experience at the Royal Children’s Hospital was so traumatic that he returned only for his annual checkups. On his last visit, the doctor told him: “I never want to see you again.” And for a decade or so, it appeared as though Lyle might never have to.

Jarrod Lyle: The Fighter Introduction | Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6
He blossomed into the golfer he always hoped he could be, winning twice on the Web.com circuit and playing his way onto the PGA Tour. He was a hero in Australia, a beacon of hope for those battling the disease, an inspiration to anyone who spent even a few minutes around him. Happy and humble and hilarious, he continued to defy the odds. Not only was he alive, and thriving, but in 2012, he and his beautiful wife, Briony, were expecting their first child. It was a miracle.
But for cancer survivors like Lyle, bad news is always just one blood test away. While in Mexico for the Mayakoba event, he received the second of three sucker-punches: the leukemia was back. Knowing the physical and emotional torture he was about to endure, he decided to delay chemotherapy, so he could hold his newborn baby, Lusi, for a day.
Once again, he pulled through, and he bravely returned to competition, playing 18 Tour events on a weakened body in 2015 and ’16. In the first tournament of his last season, he played in the group behind Robert Allenby. The coincidence wasn’t lost on either of them. Years earlier, Allenby had popped into Lyle’s hospital room in Melbourne and invited him to play golf whenever he was released. They teed it up two weeks later and became lifelong friends. Whenever Lyle was down on his game, or his luck, Allenby reminded him: “Just remember what you’ve been through. If you can fight through that, you can do anything you possibly want in life.”
Lyle had hoped to instill similar life lessons on the patients at St. Jude that sweltering summer day in 2011, but he never ventured further than the lobby of the hospital. The smell made him nauseas. The walls felt claustrophobic. The thought of seeing another sick kid in bed and wondering whether he was ever going to get out, whether he was going to be able to pursue his dreams, made him want to crawl into a corner and cry.
He apologized profusely to the hospital PR staffer, but, no, he couldn’t tour the facility. It was still too raw, too painful, too real.
Instead, with his eyes welling, he hoped that I’d be able to share his remarkable story for him.
“You just can’t give up,” he started. “If I didn’t fight, if I didn’t think about golf, if I didn’t fight my butt off, I wouldn’t be here. I’d be at a desk job doing something I hate. But I’m here doing something I love, and you know what? I wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world.”
We ended up talking for about 15 minutes, about life and death, about his fears and his dreams. Before he returned to the cushy environs of TPC Southwind, Lyle sought out the hospital employee to apologize again for not meeting some of the kids in their rooms, like Allenby had done for him all those years ago. She gently put a hand on his shoulder and tried to comfort him. “It’s OK,” she said. “I totally get it.”
Lyle worried that day whether his hopeful message would be heard, but I’ve never had a doubt.
As he spoke in the hallway, a patient wearing a navy blue Titleist hat had poked his head around the corner and stopped to listen in to our conversation.
When Lyle turned to leave, so too did the young eavesdropper.
Smiling ear to ear, he practically floated back to his hospital room.
A GoFundMe page to help support Lyle's family has been set up by Lyle's good friend Tripp Isenhour.

Article Tags: Jarrod Lyle

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